Chestnut Wins Hot Dog Contest Again. Is Eating 69 Hot Dogs Deadly?

We have a wiener.

29 year old Joey Chestnut finishes 69 hot dogs in 10 minutes in the annual Coney Island event. Not only has he won seven times in the Hot Dog Eating Contest, but he also beat his record from the previous contest. If we total up the six contests Chestnut has been in, he has eaten a total of 380 hot dogs and has digested more than 110,000 calories.

We find entertainment in watching men devour 20,000 calorie-worth of hot dogs in 10 minutes. Shouldn’t we worry for them? Chestnut, 6 feet tall and weighs 210 pounds, had said his pace was uneven in the past, but “this year I’m trying to eat a little more gracefully, conserve my energy.”

Joey Chestnut, Tim Janus, Matt Stonie

Six time winning competitive eater Joey Chestnut wins the Nathan’s Hot Dog Contest.

 

Are these eating contests healthy for us? Like every other sport, competitors risk their health and physical being. Our bodies can take only so much of anything. High consumption of anything is crucial to us. What we don’t think about is how limited the human stomach can hold before it breaks. It was studied that competitive eaters’ stomachs have become flexible because of nature, nurture, or some combination. There have been cases where people have stuffed more than five liters in their stomach. Our stomachs can only hold one or one-and-a-half liters of anything. Eating oneself to death can be very detrimental. Not only can it stretch one’s stomach, but it can also destroy the body’s reflexes. When one is to the point where they are unable to vomit, the consumption of food and/or fluid in the stomach will put pressure and weaken the tissue in the stomach. Any contents in the stomach will be sent into the body and create infections and pain.

Here is the full video of the contest.

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Police Murder Innocent Dog, TYT Anchors Argue

Sunday evening, last June 30th, Hawthorne, California, armed police officials and multiple squad cars came to a house robbery. The standoff took an hour and forty-five as  armed robbers barricaded themselves in the house. Several residents in the area were  using their smartphones to capture the moment  But the highlight of this day was when innocent Leon Rosby arrived at 137th Street and Jefferson Avenue to also videotape the standoff with his two year old Rottweiler, Max.

Mr. Rosby parked at the corner street as he began filming the two policemen close by . The officers started walking towards Rosby after hurling questions at them about the absence of any black cops on scene, and held him accountable for interference. Max began barking and jumped out of Rosby’s car.  Trying to defend and protect his owner as any dog would, Max lunged at the officers who was arresting Rosby. The officer shot the Rottweiler more than 3 times, leaving it collapsed in the streets to its death.

Here is the video that went viral of a resident filming the whole incident. WARNING: THIS VIDEO IS VERY GRAPHIC.

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The police officer who killed the dog mentioned in a statement that Rosby was impeding the standoff and was too near the law enforcement officers. He also stated that Rosby had his music on blast from his car which added a distraction at the crime scene. Was it perfectly legal for the guy to film the cops?

 

A famous News Channel on Youtube, TheYoungTurks (TYT), engaged in a healthy argument about the incident. Three out of the four TYT personalities believed that the police did not have to shoot the dog. The main anchor, Cenk Uygur, went into a little shouting match with his crew, asserting that Rosby was instigating the police officers while they were in the middle of a standoff. He mentioned that Rosby was asking the officers questions like, “Why are there no black cops?” that it was the wrong time to ask such question. Cenk Uygur sensed and concluded that Mr. Rosby was trying to get on their last nerves. The other 3 anchors found the cops “guilty”, that shooting the dog was unnecessary. What do you think?

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Leon Rosby gets interviewed by ABC where he explains the details of the incident. Mr. Rosby tells the interviewer that the officer killed a member of his family and that Max jumped out of the car in his owner’s aid.

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He put the dog on a leash and began filming. Hawthorne police deemed Rosby’s actions interference and placed him under arrest. By this point, Max was in the backseat of Rosby’s car, but the arrest upset him. He began barking, jumped out of the car and lunged at officers.

ALTERNATIVE #2: Legal Voltage Taser – check your state lawmore humane but just as effective against animal attack!

Should you face the same predicament in the future, would you have shot a dog potentially attacking you or use a pepper spray, stun gun, or a taser

You Should Take These if You are on Antibiotics

A team of scientists at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has discovered why long-term treatment with many common antibiotics can cause harmful side effects—and they have uncovered two easy strategies that could help prevent these dangerous responses. They reported the results in the July 3rd issue of Science Translational Medicine.

“Clinical levels of antibiotics can cause oxidative stress that can lead to damage to DNA, proteins and lipids in human cells, but this effect can be alleviated by antioxidants,” said Jim Collins, Ph.D., who led the study. Collins, a pioneer of synthetic biology and Core Faculty member at the Wyss Institute, is also the William F. Warren Distinguished Professor at Boston University, where he leads the Center of Synthetic Biology.

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Antibiotics cause oxidative stress in cells, which leads to cellular damage. For example, in healthy cells (left), mitochondria, which are labeled yellow here, are long and highly branched. But in cells treated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin (right), mitochondria are abnormally short and unbranched, and they do not function as well. Credit: Sameer Kalghatgi and Catherine S. Spina

Doctors often prescribe antibiotics freely, thinking that they harm bacteria while leaving human tissue unscathed. But over the years reports have piled up about the occasional side effects of various antibiotics, including tendonitis, inner-ear problems and hearing loss, diarrhea, impaired kidney function, and other problems.

Collins suspected these side effects occurred when antibiotics triggered oxidative stress – a condition in which cells produce chemically reactive oxygen molecules that damage the bacteria’s DNA and enzymes, as well as the membrane that encloses the cell.

Collins’ team had already discovered that antibiotics that kill bacteria do so by triggering oxidative stress in the bacteria. They wondered whether antibiotics caused side effects by triggering oxidative stress in the mitochondria, a bacterium-like organelle that supplies human cells with energy.

Sameer Kalghatgi, Ph.D., a former postdoctoral fellow in Collins’ laboratory who is now Senior Plasma Scientist at EP Technologies in Akron, Ohio, and Catherine S. Spina, a M.D./Ph.D. candidate at Boston University and researcher at the Wyss Institute, first tested whether clinical levels of three antibiotics — ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, kanamycin –- each cause oxidative stress in cultured human cells. They found that all of these drugs were safe after six hours of treatment, but longer-term treatment of about four days caused the mitochondria to malfunction.

Kalghatgi and Spina then did a series of biochemical tests, which showed that the same three antibiotics damaged the DNA, proteins and lipids of cultured human cells — exactly what one would expect from oxidative stress.

The results mean that “doctors should only prescribe antibiotics when they’re called for, and patients should only ask for antibiotics when they have a serious bacterial infection,” Collins said.

The team also treated mice with the same three antibiotics in mouse-sized doses similar to what patients receive in the clinic. Long-term treatment with each of the three antibiotics damaged the animal’s lipids and caused levels of glutathione, one of the body’s natural antioxidants, to fall – another sign of oxidative stress.

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Taking Antibiotics causes OXIDATIVE STRESS and DAMAGE to your system. This can be significantly minimized with an FDA-APPROVED antioxidant called N-AcetylCysteine (NAC) that’s already used to help treat children with cystic fibrosis.

To make a difference in the clinic, however, the scientists still needed a way to prevent antibiotic-induced oxidative stress – or a way to remediate it as it was occurring. They found both. They were able to prevent oxidative stress by using a bacteriostatic antibiotic – an antibiotic such as tetracycline that stops bacteria from multiplying but doesn’t kill them. They could also ease oxidative stress by mopping up chemically reactive oxygen molecules with an FDA-approved antioxidant called N-acetylcysteine, or NAC, that’s already used to help treat children with cystic fibrosis.

The new results come on the heels of two other recent breakthroughs on antibiotic treatment from Collins’ group – a report in Nature showing that viruses in the gut that infect bacteria harbor genes that confer antibiotic resistance, and another report in Science Translational Medicine showing that silver can boost the effectiveness of many widely used antibiotics.
“Jim and his team are moving at lightning speed toward unlocking the medical mysteries that stand in the way of safe and effective antibiotic treatment,” said Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., Wyss Institute Founding Director. “Doctors have known for years that antibiotics occasionally cause serious side effects, and Jim’s new findings offer not one but two exciting new strategies that could address this long-neglected public health problem.”

Next, Collins plans more animal studies to work out the best ways to remediate oxidative stress. But since both bacteriostatic antibiotics and NAC are already FDA-approved, doctors might be using this strategy soon.

“We’re interested in seeing if this could be moved toward the clinic,” Collins said.

Source: Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Losing Weight With Virtual Avatars

New study shows that watching virtual avatars will help make women lose weight. It has been the most inexpensive way to lose weight and one does not have to be a “gamer” to use virtual reality to learn important skill on how to lose weight. “Researchers found that women who watched an avatar exercise, eat healthy and make measurable weight loss goals lost an average of 3.5 pounds over four weeks.”  Not only can this be for women, but for men too.

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This study can open up new doors for new obesity treatments. 128 women were surveyed and more than 88% thought that watching an avatar could help them lose weight.  Researchers then enrolled these women to test this study. They were given a four-week DVD course in which they watched an avatar learn about portion sizes, walk at a moderate pace on a treadmill, and have different types of exercises and healthy habits. The women were able to change and customize their avatars to resemble them. “When an avatar looks like you, it increases self-efficacy, which is somebody’s confidence that they themselves have the ability to do that act,” Napolitano said. “You can visualize yourself doing something and realize, ‘Wow, it’s really not that hard.'”

Youtube Celebrates SCOTUS Ruling with Hashtag Campaign

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Recently in California, same-sex marriage has been approved. Youtube celebrates gay marriage by changing their logo and showing their pride and love through a series of  “Coming Out” videos. Some notable #ProudtoLove channels Youtube presented are wickydkewl, TheEllenShow, WHATTHEBUCKSHOW, MyHarto, and many more.
Same-sex marriage has been frowned upon due to many reasons. There are higher suicide rates among the LGBT youth than the general population. It is said that this is connected to a heterocentric culture.

“At YouTube, we believe that everyone has the right to love and be loved. We strive to make YouTube a place where all communities can feel proud to express themselves and connect through video. That’s why we’re proud to stand with the LGBT community and support equal rights and marriage equality for all.”

Show your pride. Share your love. #ProudToLove

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The Largest Beef Recall in U.S. History

Recalled cases of beef from National Beef Packing Co. in Liberal, Kansas, include 10 pound packages of “National Beef” 80/20 Coarse Ground Chuck, package code “0481,” 10 pound packages of “National Beef” 81/19 Coarse Ground Beef, package code “0421” and 10 pound packages of “National Beef” 80/20 Fine Ground Chuck, package code “0484.”

The affected products have a use/sell date of June 14, 2013 and were produced on May 25, 2013. Cases were shipped to institutions and retail establishments and FSIS has expressed concern that some product may remain in consumers’ freezers.

No illnesses have been reported in association with the consumption of these products. The contamination was found as a result of routine inspection by FSIS.

CNN reports “A slaughterhouse that has been accused of mistreating cows agreed Sunday to recall 143 million pounds of beef in what federal officials called the largest beef recall in U.S. history.”

The American Pageant: New World Beginnings

The world was very different from how it is now. “…a single supercontinent [Pangea] contained all the world’s dry land” Mother nature played its part and separated the continent, “opening the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, narrowing the Pacific Ocean, and forming the great landmasses of Eurasia, Africa, Australia, Antarctica and the Americas”.

-Canadian Shield: a zone undergirded by ancient rock, probably the first part of what became the North American landmass to have emerged above sea level.

“Only Great Salt Lake remained as a relic of Bonneville’s former vastness. Today Lake Bonneville’s ancient beaches are visible on mountains-sides up to 1,000 feat above the dry floor of the Great Basin.” Continue reading ‘The American Pageant: New World Beginnings’

Benefits of Cloning

Cloning is a “process that can be used to genetically identical copies of a biological entry.” Cloning is not a simple process, but humans should have the choice of reproductive cloning. Cloning has been part of nature so it is a natural process in the world. “Natural clones occur in humans and other mammals.” The technique is used to close whole animals is referred to as reproductive cloning.” I firmly support cloning for it has many benefits such as helping those with infertility, defective genes, and cloning should be accepted, seeing that it has been part of the human world.

Many couples today who want to have children, but cannot due to infertility, human cloning could be their only key to having a family. There is adopting, but what about those who want to have a baby of their own? It is estimated there are 12 million infertile Americans. The majority cannot be helped by any current method of assisted reproduction to have a baby that is biologically theirs.” Their only answer to having children “biologically” is cloning.

“People on an average carry 8 defective genes and these genes cause certain illnesses. Some defective genes include Down’s syndrome and Tay-Sachs disease among others.” Only human cloning can eliminate any types of defects in our genes.  “Human cloning and the technologies associated with cloning, should be allowed to be legalized and practiced due to the benefits that cloning could add to society and quality of life itself.” Continue reading ‘Benefits of Cloning’

My Migraine Episode

On the week of August 27th, I had to be sent to the Emergency Room because of a terrible headache. It started with my vision. I was seeing these indescribable dots meandering in my eyes. Everywhere I looked, the white dots were visible and at first I thought I was going blind or there was something wrong with my eyeglasses. After about 10 minutes or so, I started having a massive headache, feeling nauseous. I tried to sleep the headache off, but it still would not work. My brother took my temperature, and it was lower than normal; 92.4F. After about an hour of going back and forth to the bathroom and the bedroom, feeling like I need to vomit,  I told my mother that I need to go to the hospital because I could not take the headache anymore.

Standing up was not an easy concept my body could endure at this point. Everything was in circular motion and I kept having the feeling that I was going to tumble down at any second.  When I was in the Emergency Room, the nurse gave me three shots to subside the migraine and make me fall asleep.

After getting checked by the doctor, he concluded that it was  migraine with aura and vertigo (spinning sensation).  My primary doctor gave me SUMAtriptan (IMITREX) to relieve any occurring migraines I may have in the future.  The doctor also gave me a list that may have aggravated the migraine: Continue reading ‘My Migraine Episode’

Your Neighborhood Determines Your Chance of Surviving Cardiac Arrest

The odds of surviving cardiac arrest may depend on which part of town you call home and whether anyone in the neighborhood comes to your rescue by attempting to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), according to a first-of-its-kind study in the June issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. Continue reading ‘Your Neighborhood Determines Your Chance of Surviving Cardiac Arrest’

Sugar Band-Aid Heals Post-Surgery Wounds!

A compound found in sunless tanning spray may help to heal wounds following surgery, according to new results published by plastic surgeons from NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City and biomedical engineers at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., where the novel compound was developed. Continue reading ‘Sugar Band-Aid Heals Post-Surgery Wounds!’

Soy Molecule Reduces Menopausal Symptoms!

Preclinical safety data also report natural S-Equol had little effect on 2 reproductive hormones

Natural S-equol, a novel soy germ-based compound, is very likely the primary ingredient for reducing hot flushes in the dietary supplement SE5-OH, which is under development for reduction of menopause symptoms, according to pre-clinical efficacy data from studies using an animal model presented at the Experimental Biology (EB) 2010 annual meeting. SE5-OH is in advanced studies in menopausal women, and peer-reviewed reports have previously documented that postmenopausal Japanese women receiving SE5-OH containing Natural S-equol significantly reduced the frequency of their hot flushes compared to women in the same study receiving a placebo (P=0.0092).
Continue reading ‘Soy Molecule Reduces Menopausal Symptoms!’

Calcium CT Scan is Better at Predicting Heart Attacks Than Lipid Blood Test

Use of a score based on the amount of calcium in coronary arteries in addition to traditional risk factors improved the classification of risk for prediction of coronary heart disease events, and placed more individuals in the most extreme risk categories, according to a study in the April 28 issue of JAMA.

The coronary artery calcium score (CACS; determined by Continue reading ‘Calcium CT Scan is Better at Predicting Heart Attacks Than Lipid Blood Test’

New Orleans oil spill captured by NASA satellite imagery

NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites are helping the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) keep tabs on the extent of the recent Gulf oil spill with satellite images from time to time. NOAA is the lead agency on oil spills and uses airplane fly-overs to assess oil spill extent. (Photo on jump) Continue reading ‘New Orleans oil spill captured by NASA satellite imagery’

Latino Teens = Sexual Adventurers? It’s Complicated Says Researcher

A University of Illinois researcher advises caution when trying to characterize gender roles and sexual behavior among this country’s Latino adolescents and young adults.

“When a recent documentary about U.S. Latinos featured two teen mothers in a 90-minute program, the Latino students in my classes thought it was an unbalanced portrayal of their community—and they were right!” said Marcela Raffaelli, a U of I professor of human and community development and co-author of a recently published chapter on Latino teen sexuality.

Latino Adolescent Couple
National surveys do show that Latino young people as a group are less likely than their non-Latino peers to use condoms and birth control and are more likely to become pregnant and have a child. But these statistics hide a much more complicated picture, she said.

For one thing, Latinos represent more than 20 different groups, and they live in very different situations in the United States.

“For example, Continue reading ‘Latino Teens = Sexual Adventurers? It’s Complicated Says Researcher’

Stem Cells from Hair Follicles May Help “Grow” New Blood Vessels

muscle progenitor cellBUFFALO, N.Y. — For a rich source of stem cells to be engineered into new blood vessels or skin tissue, clinicians may one day look no further than the hair on their patients’ heads, according to new research published earlier this month by University at Buffalo engineers.

“Engineering blood vessels for bypass surgery, promoting the formation of new blood vessels or regenerating new skin tissue using stem cells obtained from the most accessible source — hair follicles — is a real possibility,” said Stelios T. Andreadis, Ph.D., co-author of the paper in Cardiovascular Research and associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering in the UB School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Researchers from other institutions previously had shown that hair follicles contain stem cells.

Continue reading ‘Stem Cells from Hair Follicles May Help “Grow” New Blood Vessels’

Major collaboration uncovers surprising new genetic clues to diabetes

Analysis identifies potential new therapeutic targets

An international team that included scientists from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), today reported it has identified six more genetic variants involved in type 2 diabetes, boosting to 16 the total number of genetic risk factors associated with increased risk of the disease. None of the genetic variants uncovered by the new study had previously been suspected of playing a role in type 2 diabetes. Intriguingly, the new variant most strongly associated with type 2 diabetes also was recently implicated in a very different condition: prostate cancer.

The unprecedented analysis, published today in the advance online edition of Nature Genetics, combined genetic data from more than 70,000 people. The work was carried out through the collaborative efforts of more than 90 researchers at more than 40 centers in Europe and North America.

“None of the genes we have found was previously on the radar screen of diabetes researchers,” said one of the paper’s senior authors, Mark McCarthy, M.D., of the University of Oxford in England. “Each of these genes, therefore, provides new clues to the processes that go wrong when diabetes develops, and each provides an opportunity for the generation of new approaches for treating or preventing this condition.” Continue reading ‘Major collaboration uncovers surprising new genetic clues to diabetes’

Selenium supplements may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes

Selenium, an antioxidant included in multivitamin tablets thought to have a possible protective effect against the development of type 2 diabetes, may actually increase the risk of developing the disease, an analysis by researchers at the University at Buffalo has shown.

Results of a randomized clinical trial using 200 micrograms of selenium alone showed that 55 percent more cases of type 2 diabetes developed among participants randomized to receive selenium than in those who received a placebo pill.

Results will appear in print in the August 2007 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine and were posted online on July 10.

Self-reported diagnosis of type 2 diabetes was a secondary endpoint in a clinical trial designed to test the benefit of selenium supplementation in prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer in areas in the Eastern U.S. where selenium levels are lower than the national average. Selenium is a trace mineral that is an essential component of proteins involved in antioxidant activity. Continue reading ‘Selenium supplements may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes’

Women, Arthritis Sufferers have Poorer Short-Term Recovery from Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

New research by Yale medical student identifies different factors for optimal short- versus long-term recovery.

The factors associated with poor short-term recovery from knee surgery appear to be different than those found to mar long-term outcome from the same surgery, according to new research released today at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine at the Telus Convention Center (July 12-15).

“We found that women showed poorer short-term recovery than men in the first year following arthroscopic meniscal tear removal surgery, and people with osteoarthritis also did not do as well as others,” says principal investigator Peter Fabricant, BS, a medical student at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn. “The factors associated with a poorer long-term outcome, such as larger tear size, greater amount of tissue removed, advanced patient age, and higher Body Mass Index, are not the same as those we can associate with short-term surgical recovery.” Continue reading ‘Women, Arthritis Sufferers have Poorer Short-Term Recovery from Arthroscopic Knee Surgery’

Jordin Sparks is Fat!

Don’t look at me. Some visual expert named Meme Roth has expressed her dismay at Jordin Sparks for not being a good role model because “apparently”, she’s not fat, but obese. Now this is some good TV, everything is going crazy at FOX News!

I’m pretty careful with the articles I write in this blog, citing sources whenever applicable. And I believe so should everybody else, especially professionals in the medical field. I didn’t see any MD attached to her name. Dietitian? Nutritionist, maybe? Her website mentions nothing but a cute slogan, “I am the picture and message of prevention…” Uh, if preventing me from getting fat is this eye-soring, sorry, ma’am, I’ll pass.

Sure, you don’t need to be an MS or have a PhD to call someone fat, as much as Rachel Ray needs no measuring cups, miraculously eyeballing all her fluid ingredients to concoct a fabulous 30-minute meal (not that I have anything against RR). However, this video clip is such a hair-pulling moment.

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Continue reading ‘Jordin Sparks is Fat!’